Research Paper

A Strong Shift in Perspective.

I’ve come to realize that my development as an artist through this course, was both a catalyst, and sibling to my development as a tattoo artist. I still recall a prominent Skype conversation initiated by Jonathan - What is digital art? Is that an appropriate term to use in describing what we, as a collective in the course, do?  My connection to the digital has always been the most promising form of self-expression; whether remaining digital or further translating into a different materiality. 

My own traumas have made it harder to communicate the self with my environment through speech or text. It has become vital for my existence, to be able to communicate the self through other means. In the process of making, somehow, that communication is achieved, whether it gets seen by anyone or not. 

Becoming a tattoo artist has been the most challenging journey i’ve ever chosen - but the most beautiful one too. I’ve found a way of communication that I can practice in the form of a collaboration. Profoundly, it achieves for myself, the highest dose of self-development ~ a much needed one for a mind like my own. 

The sphere connects a greater journey, one I haven’t been able to discover as of yet. Perhaps it shall be a placeholder until it finds its moment in future realization. What I do know, however, is that tattooing has helped me discover more about it, and in this direction, i hope, i’ll be closer to understanding it. 

I’ve decided to redirect my research, a more focused approach into my current journey. The working title; “Tattooing as a Collaborative Act of Self-Development”. 

RS Abstract

Spheres, an Allusion to Empathy: A Semiotic Examination of the Sphere-Body Interaction.

This paper examines the concept of Empathy through a semiotic analysis of spheres. Observing the visual evolution of halo motifs in Christian Art and its gradual decline with the growth of naturalism in the 15th Century, sets a focus and starting point in investigating the sphere in covert or overt contact with the body. Contemporary ‘Digital Fine Art’ seems to resuscitate this sphere-body connection, particularly alongside the development of visual-simulation software. At its current capacity, the ability to simulate in four dimensions, with the use of 360 and Virtual-Reality practices, reveals an enhanced understanding of applying perspective into creative practice. In order to clarify this reformation, I will examine two-dimensional contemporary works that encompass sphere-body interaction(s), on and off screen. Terms such as material and mark-making shall be examined alongside this investigation, introducing a way of alluding to Empathy through visual language; a placeholder in representing the ways in which we connect to the Innenwelt and Umwelt. This paper intends to demonstrate the seemingly fragmented definition(s) of Empathy, and a proposed method of visually referencing it for further communication, study and decryption.